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The following is a number of interesting links found over the past few years. No proper literature search has been done, so the list is far from being representative. Further suggestions would be welcomed.

    1 The UIAA Safety Standard for Dynamic (Climbing) Rope is:   Here   A key feature of UIAA standards is that they no longer cover the demands that the European Norm standards cover. So for example, UIAA 101_v7 on dynamic rope states that it requires a dynamic rope to cover the requirements of EN 892:2012 as well as those included in UIAA 101. A key requirement of EN892:2012 is that the rope can withstand at least 5 drops of a test mass, known as the dynamic drop test. The rig used to undertake this dynamic drop test is often known as a Dodero and occasionally, test data is referred to by that name. (There is however, no requirement in the standard for the rope to withstand a slowly applied force as applied by a tensile test rig, often known as a static force test.) Section 3.3.3 of UIAA 101_v7 covers the process of deriving extension from the force time data of a dynamic drop test and thus calculating the energy consumed by the dynamic rope in arresting the fall of a test mass.

    2 The UIAA Safety Standard for Low Stretch (SRT or semi static ropes) Ropes is:   Here   Like the dynamic rope standard, the low stretch rope standard UIAA 107_v4 also states that it requires a low stretch rope to cover the requirements of EN 1891:1998 as well as those included in UIAA 107. A key requirement of EN1891:1998 is that the rope can withstand at least 5 drops of a test mass, known as the dynamic drop test. However, the details of the dynamic drop test are different for those for EN892:2012. Another significant requirement of EN1891:1998 is that the low stretch rope can also withstand a force of more than 22kN for a Type A rope as applied by a tensile test rig, often known as a static force test. (EN1891:1998 covers two types of low stretch rope, A and B.)

    3 EN standards are produced by the European Committee for Standardisation (CEN) and are immediately adopted by a wide range of European and other countries including the UK. In the UK they are usually referenced as BS EN standards but often the initials BS are omitted. Regrettably the accessibility of EN standards in the UK is heavily restricted in that few libraries now have a subscription to the British Standards Institute. The purchase price demanded by British Standards for EN standards is excessive when compared to other national bodies such as Estonia, see   Here   who often offer EN standards in English for a fraction of the BS price. (For example, as at 2018, the Estonian Centre for Standardisation were offering EN892 in English for Euro €13.22 compared to GB Pound £170 by the British Standards Institute.)

    4 Pat Shubert who was President of the UIAA Safety Commision for many years, undertook some significant work on the aging of climbing ropes found that using the dynamic drop test, the performance of a climbing rope quickly dropped off with use but then slowed down and continued for a considerable period of use. A summary of his work can be found at This site

    5 Owen Clark initiated some work on low stretch ropes of a similar nature to that of Pit Schubert. The outcome of that work can be found at   This site   and follow the pattern found by Pit Schubert.

    6 Ulrich Leuthausser has undertaken some impressive theoretical work on the behaviour of rope which can be read Here

    7 The British Mountaineering Council has produced a booklet on ropes at This site   It provides some basic information on climbing ropes, including inspection and maintenance.

    8 A J McLaren produced a paper on the Design and performance of ropes for climbing and sailing which can be read Here

    9 A translation of a French paper on Cows Tails can be found Here  The work was conducted on both new and used cows tails with differing knots. It recommends using cows tails made from dynamic rope and using knots to make the loop terminations so as to create a system which will absorb the energy of a drop with the least peak force.

    10 Some preliminary work was conducted by ourselves on various Y hang knots following a report that a fall on the classic bowline on the bight could result in a catastrophic slip of rope within the knot causing the release of the person on the rope. The work was reported Here  The alternative Y hang knots investigated did not show a similar behaviour.

    11 The UIAA held a symposium in 2002 on ropes. A summary can be read Here   An address is supplied to obtain the proceedings.

    12 SAR3 provides a range of references, Here